On Thiz Day In History (our story)

Race riot in Mississippi Date: Wed, 1875-09-01 *On this date in 1875, White Democrats attacked Republicans at Yazoo City, Mississippi. The riot happened because of the pressure on White supremacy in the aftermath of the Civil War. Southern defeat and Reconstruction gave Blacks more freedom and nearly all Whites resented the change. The result of […]

1st Black Child in all white School

Her Name:  Ruby Bridges was a brave little girl. She made her first entry into an all-white school on November 14, 1960. As soon as Bridges entered the school, white parents pulled their own children out; all teachers refused to teach while a black child was enrolled.  Only one person agreed to teach Ruby and […]

Remember the 1955 Cannon Street YMCA All-Starz That Were Not Allowed To Play In The Little League World Seriez

      Dozens of boys played during the spring and summer of 1955 in Charleston, South Carolina, in the first black Little League in the state of South Carolina. When the season ended, the coaches selected the best players for an all-star team and registered the team for the city tournament. The boys were […]

On Thiz Day In History (our story)

The “Mississippi Plan” begins Date: Tue, 1890-08-12 *On this date in 1890, The Mississippi Constitutional Convention began systematic exclusion of Blacks from the politics of South. The Mississippi Plan (Literacy and “understanding tests”) lasted until November 1st of that year and was later adopted with embellishments by other states: South Carolina (1895), Louisiana (1898), North […]

Survivorz of Black Wall Street race riot still haven’t received any reparationz

by Yvette Carnell, BreakingBrown Some financial observers attribute the Black community’s economic woes to our unwillingness to financially support Black businesses. Well, back in 1921, in a Tulsa, Oklahoma, community named Black Wall Street, a dollar circulated 19 times before leaving the community. That was before a white mob destroyed the town. Given the ferocity […]

On Thiz Day In History (our story)

  Congress legislates equal pay to Black soldiers Charges against Private Ray Date: Tue, 1864-06-14 *On this date in 1864, Congress passed the enrollment Act that authorized equal pay for Black soldiers. During the Civil War, African-Americans formed 166 regiments and fought almost 500 battles. In so doing they earned 23 Congressional Medals of Honor. […]

How the Government Bribez Police to Arrest People For Smoking Pot

AlterNet / By Aaron Cantú Police use the number of low-level drug arrests to sustain critical law enforcement funding from the federal government.   Activists have long claimed that cops have quotas for ticketing and arresting people, but evidence to support those claims varies from state to state. However, newly obtained documents reveal that local […]

Image of the Day: Lynching

  “This photograph is brutal testament to racial terrorism in America. The facts of the case are drawn from a small article that appeared in the “New York Times” on August 2, 1908, the same day the photograph was made by a local journalist. On the previous night, one hundred white men had entered the […]

The Past Isn’t Past: The Economic Case for Reparationz

  BillMoyers.com / By Joshua Holland Hundreds of years of slavery and the American-style apartheid known as Jim Crow continue to hurt the economic prospects of African-American babies born today. June 6, 2014  | “The past is in the past; it’s time to move on.” That’s a common response to Ta-Nehisi Coates’ eloquent essay in The […]

Black Children az Young az Kindergartenerz Are Getting Hand-Cuffed and Arrested Across the US: This Iz Human Rightz Abuse

  Black Agenda Report / By Margaret Kimberley Two recent cases involving the New York City police department show the perils black people face even in childhood. Americans should take a long look in the mirror before criticizing other nations for human rights abuses. The law enforcement system in the United States ranks among the […]