Althea Gibson

On this day in 1950, Althea Gibson became the first black athlete to play on the U.S. tennis tour when she was accepted to compete in the U.S. Lawn Tennis Association’s annual championship. The trailblazing Harlem phenom changed the face of American tennis. Look back at her first women’s championship win at Wimbledon.

ACTIVISTS DENOUNCE STATUE OF GYNECOLOGIST WHO USED BLACK WOMEN AS “GUINEA PIGS”

A South Carolinian physician and slave owner, Dr. J Marion Sims is considered to be the “father of modern gynecology”. Like too many other white doctors of the 19th and 20th century, Sims’ pioneering gynecological research was built on the suffering of enslaved black women who were subjugated to non-consensual and brutal experimentation. Being a […]

Nat Turner’s slave rebellion: August 21–23, 1831

Nat Turner’s Rebellion (also known as the Southampton Insurrection) was a slave rebellion that took place in Southampton County, Virginia, during August 1831. Led by Nat Turner, rebel slaves killed from 55 to 65 people, the largest and deadliest slave uprising in U.S. history.  The rebellion was put down within a few days, but Turner survived in hiding for more than […]

MOVE update – August 2017

ONA MOVE, my friends! This is an amazing time for our MOVE family. There is so much going on that I want to be sure that you’re aware of. The latest with my family’s parole status is the continuing denial of parole for our brother Delbert Africa. Delbert was recently denied parole and given a […]

George Jackson and the Eclipse

It somehow seems so fitting  that the sun should hide it’s head in shame on Aug 21 ********** lyrics to song by Bob Dylan   I woke up this mornin’, There were tears in my bed. They killed a man I really loved Shot him through the head. Lord, Lord, They cut George Jackson down. […]

Understanding Detroit’s 1967 Upheaval 50 Years Later

For five days in July, the Motor City was under siege from looters and soldiers al Firemen fight to control blazing buildings in Detroit on July 25, 1967. The city was filled with gunfire, looting and police officers for five days that July. (AP Photos ) By Lorraine Boissoneault smithsonian.com   The summer of 1967 was sultry in the United […]

A radical’s oral history of Detroit in 1967

Rebellion By Michael Jackman @michaeljackman The Tony Spina Collection, Walter P. Reuther Library, Archives of Labor and Urban Affairs, Wayne State University National Guardsmen patrol Detroit during the summer of 1967. This perspective on the events of the summer of 1967 comes from a few Metro Times fellow travelers in the form of John and Leni Sinclair, and Fifth Estate staffers Harvey […]

Letter from a Region in My Mind

by James Baldwin  1/30/1963, New York, NY. James Baldwin sprawls across the bed in his New York apartment to jot down some notes. Photograph by Bettmann / Corbis Take up the White Man’s burden— Ye dare not stoop to less— Nor call too loud on Freedom To cloak your weariness; By all ye cry or […]

BLACK PEOPLE’S DISLIKE OF THE POLICE IS LEGITIMATE AND A MATTER OF SURVIVAL

by Hassan Henderson There are no such things as “appropriate” responses to the violence forged against Black lives. Neither those who directly support the affairs of American imperialism nor their allies possess the moral skill-set to determine how we will get free. Pilgrims are in no position to define either resistance, ending Black dehumanization, or the […]