Consciousness of being: Re-imagining Biko 40 years on

A lecture delivered at the University of California Los Angeles and Freedom Park, 7 July 2017 The Drum Veli Mbele Jul 20, 2017 Forty years after Steve Biko’s murder in detention, the world we live in has not changed fundamentally for Black people. Regardless of where you reside in the world, how educated you are, […]

A History of the Omaha Black Panthers

On July 28, 1966, the Omaha World-Herald published a report about a a “200 member gang known as the Black Panthers” that “planned much of the systematic firebombing, sniping and looting in Cleveland’s slum riots.” From the outset, Omaha’s media portrayed the Black Panther Party as violent hoodlums, and in the next several years they wouldn’t stop. […]

FRAMED: Chapter 2 by Michael Richardson

Adam’s Note: This is the second chapter in a series for NorthOmahaHistory.com called Framed: J. Edgar Hoover, COINTELPRO and the Omaha Two Story. Written by author Michael Richardson. Learn more here. “My mother used to tell me to stay away from white people because they will hurt you.”—Edward Poindexter on growing up in Omaha   Edward Alan Poindexter was born […]

Brazil’s hidden slavery

By Julia Carneiro BBC Brasil, Rio de Janeiro – 25 December 2014 Rio de Janeiro is a city looking to the future. Major development work is underway in the city’s historic port area as it prepares to host the Olympics in 2016. But the construction effort to make all that happen has unexpectedly shone a light on […]

Finding Toussaint L’Ouverture in Tennessee

By Brandon Byrd Toussaint L’Ouverture meeting General Thomas Maitland, Saint-Domingue, 1790s. In the summer of 1777, as musket balls flew about New York’s battlefields, José de Gálvez felt confident. The American Revolution had unsettled the entire Atlantic World, raising new questions for the Minister of the Indies. But, amid the uncertainty of international war, he, the man charged with […]

Albert Woodfox: My 43 years in solitary confinement

Image copyrightM-A VENTOURA/AIUK by  Joanna Ing   Albert Woodfox spent 43 years in solitary confinement. He was released in February 2016, but says he is still adapting to life outside. He had been in solitary confinement in Angola prison, the state penitentiary of Louisiana, since April 1972 for the murder of prison guard Brent Miller. Along […]

Champion of the Black Community Is Given Her Rightful Due in Richmond

Maggie L. Walker fought segregation her whole life in the former capital of the Confederacy. Now her statue towers over the Virginia city The daughter of an enslaved woman, Maggie L. Walker led the fight for civil rights and women’s rights in Richmond, Virginia. (National Museum of American History) By Ben Panko In Richmond, Virginia, a city full […]

All Power to the People

“Reclaiming a missed opportunity.”

Progress and Making the Native Disappear in South Afrika

by  Richard Raber In the name of modernity and capital expansion, indigenous peoples across the globe have been slaughtered, dispossessed and made to be invisible. Through the writing out of history or blotting out of popular culture, indigenous people are often relegated to a state of pre-modernity or tradition; this continues to underpin policy. We have […]

Thank you, Lonnie Johnson, for one of summer’s best toys — the Super Soaker

NASA engineer’s invention changed summertime Toy inventor Lonnie Johnson poses with his creation “The Super Soaker” outside his Marietta, Ga., office Nov. 12, 1998. Johnson, who once worked for NASA, hit on his idea for the high-powered water gun while trying to invent a heat pump that would use water instead of Freon. AP Photo/John Bazemore […]