FEDERAL COURT WILL APPOINT MONITOR TO ENSURE ILLINOIS PRISONERS HAVE BASIC HEALTH CARE

 Stateville Correctional Center in Crest Hill, Illinois. (Jim Larrison on Flickr) 49   A settlement that includes the appointment of a monitor by a federal court was reached in a class action lawsuit over the unconstitutional lack of health care in Illinois prisons. The draft consent decree between the Illinois Department of Corrections (IDOC) and […]

Father Augustus Tolton, First Black Priest in the U.S.

He was born of the marriage union of two slaves, Peter Paul Tolton and his wife Martha Jane, in Ralls County, Missouri, April 1, 1854. The slaveholders, the Elliots, had all their slaves baptized, including the Toltons and their four children.  With the outbreak of the War between the States, Peter Paul hoped to gain […]

Venerable Pierre Toussaint

       Venerable Pierre Toussaint (1766-1853) was born a slave in Haiti and died a freeman in New York City. He is credited by many with being the father of Catholic Charities in New York. Pierre was instrumental in raising funds for the first Catholic orphanage and began the city’s first school for black children. […]

Hiding and abusing the mentally ill and physically disabled inside Texas prisons

by Keith ‘Malik’ Washington, Deputy Chairman New Afrikan Black Panther Party Prison Chapterery “We have little sense of our own power. The power is in the masses; we comrades are the masses. The actions we take from this day forward will dictate our future. You know just as I do what needs to be done […]

Dec. 25, 1837: Seminole Anti-colonial Struggle

By William Katz On Christmas day in 1837, the Africans and Native Americans who formed Florida’s Seminole Nation defeated a vastly superior U.S. invading army bent on cracnsking this early rainbow coalition and returning the Africans to slavery. Though it reads like a Hollywood thriller, this amazing story has yet to capture public attention. It […]

Slavery and Prison – Understanding the Connections

by Kim Gilmore “I’M BEGINNING TO BELIEVE THAT `U.S.A.’ STANDS FOR THE UNDERPRIVILEGED Slaves of America” (Esposito and Wood, 1982: 149), wrote a 20th-century prisoner from Mississippi in a letter detailing the daily violence he witnessed behind prison walls. His statement resounds with a long tradition of prisoners, particularly African-American prisoners, who have used the […]

Skin bleaching: Identity crisis or mental slavery?

In 1492, Christopher Columbus stumbled upon the Americas and Caribbean Islands in search of the East Indies. With open arms, the naartives welcome him as their guest, oblivious to their impending doom. Bringing with him diseases and a hidden agenda, he was following orders from the Roman Catholic church to revitalize the failing European economy under […]

Amerikan Crime: The 1944 Lynching of 15-Year-Old Willie James Howard for Writing a Christmas Card to a White Girl

  THE CRIME In December 1943, Willie James Howard, a 15-year-old Black youth, was in the 10th grade in Live Oak, Florida, and working at the local dime store. For Christmas, Willie James gave cards to all his co-workers, including a 15-year-old white girl named Cynthia Goff. He signed the card to Cynthia “with L.” […]

Here’s how British missionaries omitted verses in the Bible to curb slave rebellion

      BY FRANCIS AKHALBEY  Parts of the Holy Bible, selected for the use of the Negro Slaves, in the British West-India Islands — Photo via @museumofBible on Twitter   The Museum of the Bible in Washington, D.C., is currently exhibiting a rare Bible that was purposely used by British missionaries to convert enslaved Africans […]

The Willie Lynch Letter

The Willie Lynch Letter The Willie Lynch Letter: The Making Of A Slave! This speech was delivered by Willie Lynch on the bank of the James River in the colony of Virginia in 1712. Lynch was a British slave owner in the West Indies. He was invited to the colony of Virginia in 1712 to […]