Amerikan slavery: Separating fact from myth

Five generations of a slave family. Shutterstock People think they know everything about slavery in the United States, but they don’t. They think the majority of African slaves came to the American colonies, but they didn’t. They talk about 400 years of slavery, but it wasn’t. They claim all Southerners owned slaves, but they didn’t. […]

9 of the Best Songs About Afrika By Artists From the Diaspora

Africa, both as a place and a concept, has inspired some of the best works from musicians in the diaspora. For many, creating songs that highlight the continent is a way of fostering a connection with their African heritage. While some songs address Africa as a singular unit, they manage to steer away from the “Africa is a […]

1929 War of the Women in Nigeria

  The “riots” or the war, led by women in the provinces of Calabar and Owerri in southeastern Nigeria in November and December of 1929, became known as the “Aba Women’s Riots of 1929” in British colonial history, or as the “Women’s War” in Igbo history.  Thousands of Igbo women organized a massive revolt against […]

From foetus to Woman

  OmegaCyrus by Billene Seyoum Woldeyes Every single revolutionary who has walked this Earth has said it: The liberation of humanity is impossible without the liberation of women. And, for the millionth time, here is why: we were foetuses when they mapped out our lives some of us would glide through birth canals break open wombs […]

Amilcar Cabral’s revolutionary anti-colonialist ideas

The writings of revolutionary leader Amilcar Cabral provide key insights on the importance of culture in the contemporary struggle against neoliberalism. * This essay is featured in the Transnational Institute’s State of Power 2017 report   Amilcar Cabral and Frantz Fanon are among the most important thinkers from Africa on the politics of liberation and […]

A Digital Archive of Slave Voyages Details the Largest Forced Migration in History

An online database explores the nearly 36,000 slave voyages that occurred between 1514 and 1866   By Philip Misevich, Daniel Domingues, David Eltis, Nafees M. Khan and Nicholas Radburn, The Conversation SMITHSONIAN.COM Between 1500 and 1866, slave traders forced 12.5 million Africans aboard transatlantic slave vessels. Before 1820, four enslaved Africans crossed the Atlantic for every European, […]

Damas!

By E. Ethelbert Miller How can they really dare to call me almost white when every part of me yearns only to be black – Leon Damas The term Pan-Africanism entered my vocabulary when Stokely Carmichael (Kwame Ture) walked across the stage of Cramton Auditorium on the campus of Howard University. The year was 1970. […]

Cry my beloved South Afrika: The cancer of Afrophobia

by  Ama Biney If Steve Biko – the iconic leader of South Africa’s Black Consciousness Movement – were alive today, what would he make of the Afrophobia/xenophobia in South Africa? Would he stridently denounce it – unlike South Africa’s leaders – and seek to foster a new sense of self-love in the transformed slogan: “Black […]

Are Namez Really That Important? For Black People, the Answer Iz a Resounding ‘Yes!’

The effects of the transatlantic slave trade still resonate within the Black community in America. Slavery was the total dehumanization of Black people through exploitation and brutality. One aspect of this was the stripping away of Black culture and identity. Black people were not only branded physically, we were branded culturally with the insignia of our […]

An Unspeakable Toll: Relentlezz Violence and the Middle Passage

By Joshua Rothman This post is part of our online roundtable on Sowande’ Mustakeem’s Slavery at Sea In 1790, Thomas Trotter testified to a committee of the British House of Commons about the things he had seen while serving as a surgeon on board the slave ship Brookes in 1783. Among the stories he told was that of a West […]