Afrikan voices raised in support of people with albinism

Thereza Phinias, a musician who is part of the Tanzania Albinism Collective. Marilena Delli On the remote East African island of Ukerewe in the middle of Lake Victoria, people with albinism whose voices have been largely unheard, are now writing and voicing their experiences into songs. Ukerewe is the largest inland island in Africa and is part of […]

Kwame Nkrumah of Africa: He came to his own but his own rejected him

Reflection on the 108th birthday of the Black Star blackartdepot.com Charles Quist-Adade Sep 28, 2017 Nkrumah’s dream of African unity remains essential for total liberation and prosperity of the continent. Africans will have themselves to blame if they continue to plough their narrow furrows instead of pooling their efforts, human and material resources, in order […]

“If You Don’t Like It Here, Then Leave!”

by Nana Baakan Agyiriwah  September 29, 2017  “If You Don’t Like It Here, Then Leave!” One of the strangest things that I hear from folks these days who seem to believe that I have a problem with living in the US, is this, “If you don’t like it here, then leave, go back to Africa or […]

Racism is behind outlandish theories about Afrika’s ancient architecture

The pyramids of Giza on the outskirts of Cairo, Egypt. Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters Some of the most impressive buildings and cities ever made by humans can be found in Africa: the ruined city of Great Zimbabwe, Mapungubwein South Africa, Kenya’s Gedi Ruins and Meroe in Sudan. Perhaps the most awe-inspiring of these are the last remaining of the Seven Wonders of the […]

The Fallacy of 1619: Rethinking the History of Afrikans in Early Amerika

 September 4, 2017 by Michael Guasco “Landing of first twenty slaves at Jamestown.” 1911. Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Jean Blackwell Hutson Research and Reference Division, The New York Public Library Digital Collections.  In 1619, “20. and odd Negroes” arrived off the coast of Virginia, where they were “bought for victualle” by labor-hungry English colonists. […]

Black August, George Jackson and Marcus Garvey

by Norman (Otis) Richmond aka Jalali August is a politically charged month in the Black world: the month Marcus Garvey was born and when Black Panther George Jackson and his younger brother, Jonathan, were killed. George Jackson and Huey Newton considered themselves to be scientific socialists, but both men were once also students of Garvey […]

Black August: Celebrating Marcus Garvey

Marcus Garvey; August 17, 1887 – June 10, 1940   This article is part of a special Black August series on TheBurningSpear.com. We encourage all our readers to help launch Black Power 96.3 FM during their Black August Fund Drive. Support radio in the hands of the African community! Donate today at blackpower96.org. Each August, growing […]

Brazil’s hidden slavery

By Julia Carneiro BBC Brasil, Rio de Janeiro – 25 December 2014 Rio de Janeiro is a city looking to the future. Major development work is underway in the city’s historic port area as it prepares to host the Olympics in 2016. But the construction effort to make all that happen has unexpectedly shone a light on […]

Progress and Making the Native Disappear in South Afrika

by  Richard Raber In the name of modernity and capital expansion, indigenous peoples across the globe have been slaughtered, dispossessed and made to be invisible. Through the writing out of history or blotting out of popular culture, indigenous people are often relegated to a state of pre-modernity or tradition; this continues to underpin policy. We have […]

Brazil’s Valongo Slave Port Becomes UNESCO Heritage Site

The Valongo Wharf in Rio de Janeiro where slaves were brought from Afrika during the 1800s. | Photo: AFP “From a historic point of view, this is a testimony to one of the most brutal episodes in the history of humankind,” a statement read. Unesco designated Brazil’s Valongo port a World Heritage Site this weekend. […]