1968 Olympics: An Afrikan-Amerikan Summer of Love and Reckoning

The 1968 Summer Olympics were 50 years ago this week. Tommie Smith’s and John Carlos’ raised gloved fists were many African Americans’ Summer of Love – and Pride, and Reckoning.  by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar  Gold medallist Tommie Smith (center) and bronze medalist John Carlos (right) raise their fists at the 1968 Summer Olympics, Wikimedia Commons In the summer of […]

Why Black Lives Still Don’t Matter

Photo by All-Nite-Images via flickr   In 1956, Harrison Finley, a black man, was shot dead in front of his parents’ home in Washington, DC by police officers for purportedly resisting arrest— “a catch-all charge that covers practically everything from loud talking to necking”—according to a leading African-American newspaper at the time. He was a […]

Clarence Brandley: A legacy of perseverance and struggle

By Gloria Rubac         September 22, 2018 Houston — Death row exoneree #40, Clarence Brandley, was honored and remembered at his funeral on Sept. 14. His five children, other relatives, his attorneys, investigators and members of the Coalition to Free Clarence Brandley helped fill the large New Loyalty Missionary Baptist Church in northeast Houston. Dozens of […]

Beautiful Struggle: The Iconicity of Cuban Hip-Hop And Political Exile Nehanda Abiodun

Written By Marjua Estevez https://players.brightcove.net/5428592013001/default_default/index.html?videoId=5834958814001   Nehanda Isoke Abiodun, née Cheri Laverne Dalton, was just 10 years old when she joined the picket lines. Columbia University in the ’60s was taking over her neighborhood park to build a gym for alumni and students. “Those of us who lived in the community had no access to the […]

Meet the gallant all-black Amerikan female battalion that served in Europe during World War II

The first time American women fought in a war was during the American Civil War. Women were not allowed to be selected into the draft, so they disguised themselves as men and fought instead. A few of them were only discovered to be women when found dead. American women were only allowed to serve in […]

Afrikan-Amerikan suffrage: Voting rights and suppression

By Dolores Cox At the end of the U.S. Civil War, the 13th, 14th and 15th Reconstruction Amend­ments to the U.S. Constitution were ratified. In 1865, the 13th Amendment abolished “slavery and involuntary servitude” — except for people convicted of a crime. In 1868, the 14th Amendment granted citizenship to African Americans, albeit second-class citizenship. The […]

March With The Freedom Fighters Contingent In Harlem’s 49th Annual Afrikan Amerikan Day Parade

SAVE THE DATE IN HARLEM  BECAUSE IT’S GOING DOWN ON SEPTEMBER 16th! COME WEAR YOUR BLACK FREEDOM FIGHTER SHERO/HERO T-SHIRTS; BRING YOUR BLACK LIBERATION FLAGS; CARRY YOUR BANNERS & JOIN US IN MARCHING WITH THE FREEDOM FIGHTERS CONTINGENT @ HARLEM’S 49TH ANNUAL AFRICAN AMERICAN DAY PARADE COME & MARCH WITH THE FREEDOM FIGHTERS CONTINGENT ON SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 2018 AT HARLEM’S […]

Meet Prince Hall, the Amerikan abolitionist who founded black Freemasonry in 1775

Prince Hall is known as the father of black Freemasonry Between the 16th and 17th century, the fraternal tradition of Freemasonry in North America was largely a white organization. Today, thanks to an African-American abolitionist, Prince Hall, many African Americans belong to a group of Masons. Known as the father of Black Freemasonry, Prince Hall […]

Through his art, a former prisoner diagnoses the systemic sickness of Florida’s penitentiaries

Moliere Dimanche would use anything he could scrounge up – pieces of folders, the back of commissary forms, old letters – as canvases. Moliere Dimanche, Author provided In 2007, Haitian-American artist Moliere Dimanche was sentenced to 10 years in Florida state prisons, where he ended up serving eight-and-a-half years. While imprisoned, he made art – a series […]

National Association of Colored Graduate Nurses founded

Freedman Hospital Washington D.C., 1943 *On this date in 1908, the National Association of Colored Graduate Nurses (NACGN) was founded. Martha Minerva Franklin founded the association. This was an organization dedicated to promoting the standards and welfare of Black nurses and breaking down racial discrimination in the profession. This organization served an important need, as […]