States of Women’s Incarceration: The Global Context

By Aleks Kajstura and Russ Immarigeon Introduction We already know that when it comes to incarceration, the United States is truly exceptional. As we have reported previously, the United States incarcerates 716 people for every 100,000 residents, more than any other country. Worldwide, and within the U.S., the vast majority of those incarcerated are men. As a result, […]

“Rikers: An American Jail”: A New Film on Mass Incarceration

By Michael T. Barry Jr This post is part of my blog series that announces the release of new films in African American History and African Diaspora Studies. Today, I am featuring “Rikers: An American Jail”  which is currently screening at locations across the country and is streaming at RIKERSfilm.org. *** Bill Moyers With an introduction by executive editor Bill Moyers, this […]

Women’s Mass Incarceration: The Whole Pie 2017

By Aleks Kajstura October 19, 2017 With growing public attention to the problem of mass incarceration, people want to know about women’s experience with incarceration. How many women are held in prisons, jails, and other correctional facilities in the United States? And why are they there? While these are important questions, finding those answers requires not […]

the “Snow Riot”

In 1835 Washington discovered Francis Scott Key, author of the national anthem, had a thing or two to learn about freedom By Jefferson Morley Sunday, February 6, 2005; Page W14 THE LAMPLIGHTER CAME AROUND AT DUSK. With his long flaming pole poked skyward, he sparked the bowls of oil atop the fluted posts around Lafayette Square. […]

Black Power in Papua New Guinea

by Quito Swan Chico Neblett and Bobby Seale (back) leading audience with a Black Power salute at the Black Community Survival Conference, March 30, 1972 (Bob Fitch Photography Archive, Stanford University Libraries) The Black Power Movement stretched across the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific ocean worlds in both expected and surprising ways. Scholarship on Black Power in Oceania has largely […]

The Decline of Imperialism: Dangers and Opportunities

by Dave Gilbert  Trump’s election has set off an exciting eruption of protests; at the same time, the challenges we face are daunting. To fully grasp the dangers and opportunities ahead we need to look at the decline of imperialism, which is the context for the rise of this loathsome demagogue. Increased divisions, confusion, and […]

To Be Black, Brown and In Between in 2017

by Jessica Floyd and Nina Vázquez Jessica Floyd is the daughter of Gregory Floyd. Jessica Floyd (2018; Politics and Government with minors in Africana Studies, Communications and Sociology) and Nina Vázquez (2019; Criminal Justice and Politics and Government with a focus in Race and Ethnic Inequalities) are students at the University of Hartford.   Many […]

A Raised Voice

How Nina Simone turned the movement into music. By Claudia Roth Pierpont Simone with James Baldwin in the early sixties. Her intelligence and restless force attracted African-American culture’s finest minds. Courtesy New York Public Library. “My skin is black,” the first woman’s story begins, “my arms are long.” And, to a slow and steady beat, “my […]

DPRK: White Supremacy’s Global Agenda

by USW7 September 2017    permalink Through the eye of the media, one can’t help but see and understand the agendas being put forth. First look at how the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea’s nuclear program is being covered with emotionally-driven and fear-inspiring news coverage. In comparison to the cold war period in the United States, where that […]