Resurrecting the Radical Pedagogy of the Black Panther Party

Drawing inspiration from the Highlander Folk School (1932-present), Citizenship Schools (1957-1965), and Freedom Schools (Summer 1964), the founding members of the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense (BPP) believed that a learner-driven, politically relevant, and transgressive education that empowers youth to expose the existential contradictions of their own lives creates the conditions necessary for a world […]

POETIC TRIBUTE TO MALCOLM AND AMIRI!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE   JAZZ POET ZAYID MUHAMMAD, SCHOLAR WRITER ANTOINETTE ELLIS-WILLIAMS SALUTE MALCOLM X AND AMIRI BARAKA AT EAST ORANGE LIBRARY! On Thursday, February 16th, 2017, East Orange Library’s ‘Cultural Café’ will present a special evening poetic tribute to Malcolm X and Amiri Baraka. The event will feature Newark based Jazz poet and people’s artist ‘Mr. […]

Fifty Years Later, Black Pantherz’ Art Still Resonatez

The Black Panther Party was founded 50 years ago in Oakland, on Oct. 15, 1966, and within two years it had chapters across the country. The New York Times is taking this opportunity to explore the Black Panthers’ legacy, through their iconic use of imagery and how they were covered in its own pages. The […]

Designing The Black Pantherz

We talk to Emory Douglas, the minister of culture for the Black Panther party, about how he came to join the Black Panther Party, the Internet, and what the images and icons of today’s racial justice movements are missing. [Image: © 2016 Emory Douglas/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York] From 1968 to 1980, supporters of […]

Sonia Sanchez

1934– , Birmingham , AL Sonia Sanchez was born Wilsonia Benita Driver on September 9, 1934, in Birmingham, Alabama. After her mother died in childbirth a year later, Sanchez lived with her paternal grandmother and other relatives for several years. In 1943, she moved to Harlem with her sister to live with their father and […]

VIDEO: Amiri Baraka – “Something In The Way Of Thingz [In Town]” (2x

A visual adaptation of Baraka’s poetic and foreboding social commentary (with music by The Roots.) Shot on three different types of film and two different types of video over three months with at least fifty actors/extras in about twenty-five locations in the West Philly area by one guy (Bryan Green). source: http://kalamu.com/neogriot/2015/12/27/video-amiri-baraka-something-in-the-way-of-things-in-town-2x/

“The Devil Findz Work”: New York City Honorz itz Own Native Son James Baldwin

By Dana C. Ayres James Baldwin was one of the foremost critical thinkers and one of the most prolific writers in American history. His fans, the world over, are given a clear glimpse into his ability to dissect American culture from an objective standpoint, all the while relating everything to his readers from a tangible […]

For Hip-Hop: Amiri Baraka and Black Radical Art

For Hip-Hop: Amiri Baraka (October 7, 1934 – January 9, 2014) and Black Radical Art Jared A. Ball “There is, of course, the syndrome Lenin spoke about when he said that once opponents of the bourgeoisie are dead the rulers transform these class enemies into ciphers or agreeable sycophants of Imperialism (however “askew” they might […]

Kidz Who Die by Langston Hughez 1938

It’s been 77 years since civil rights activist and poet Langston Hughes wrote his chilling poem “Kids Who Die” which illuminates the horrors of lynchings during the Jim Crow era. Now, as we approach the one year mark of Michael Brown’s death and the Ferguson uprising that sparked a movement, we can see how Hughes’ […]

Yasiin Bey (aka Mos Def) reflectz on the legacy of Malcolm X

by Wax Poetics To commemorate the 90th birthday of Malcolm X on Tuesday (May 19, 2015), Yasiin Bey (aka Mos Def) speaks on the significance of Malcolm X today, especially for those who Bey says are “…poor, or hungry, or hunted.” Taken from an interview with Yasiin Bey shot in Paris with curator Sohail Daulatzai for […]