First, dry your tears and give a loving salute to our newest ancestor, KIILU NYASHA

  For all of us, a teacher who breathed vibrant life into Black history and inspired us to keep making it, for me, a little sister, just two months younger, the guide I leaned on to light the way through dark times, Kiilu Nyasha was a Black Panther from the moment she joined the party […]

Act Out! [106] – Black Pantherz: Fight and Build & the Poor and Poisoned

by Eleanor Goldfield This week on Act Out, racism is nothing new but the current political climate has renewed its vigor. After dissecting some recent racist bigotry, we talk to former Black Panther Kiilu Nyasha about racism, systemic corruption and the past and present of pointed fight & build activism. Next, Flint is nearing its […]

Haiti’z Fanmi Lavalaz and the Black Panther Party­ (BPP)

by Kiilu Nyasha This year of 2016 marks the 50th anniversary of the founding of the Black Panther Party for Self Defense, October 1966, in Oakland, California. In 1968, prior to joining the Party, I was employed by Community Progress, Inc. (CPI), the nation’s pilot program of President Lyndon Johnson’s “War on Poverty,” also euphemistically […]

YogW. been through hell and was not burnt

by Roderick Lear The SHU, the wars, the times and obviously the love and hate he experienced made Yog who he was. When I met him in 2001, I of course had read about him and heard the stories, but I was definitely not prepared to meet anyone like that. One of the letters in […]

“Iola,” Princess of the Press: The Story of Feminist Anti-Lynching Crusader, Ida B. Welllz-Barnett, by Kiilu Nyasha

“I then began an investigation of every lynching I read about.  By 1893, over a thousand Black men, women and children had been hanged, shot and burned to death by white mobs in America.” A tireless champion of her people, Ida B. Wells was the first of eight children born to Jim and Elizabeth Wells […]

Why I Won’t Do Kwaanza

by Bruce A. Dixon I don’t do Kwaanza, I just don’t. I never have, and the very thought of it evokes some difficult memories and feelings for me. It’s not the holiday’s religious trappings or its Afro-syncretic fusion of Jewish menorahs, Swahili words, Kemetic, Christian and other rituals. I understand people do have a perfect […]

The Outer Limitz of Solitary Confinement

This public forum, entitled “The Outer Limits of Solitary Confinement,” held at UC Hastings College of the Law, in San Francisco on April 6, 2012 was organized by the International Coalition to Free the Angola 3, and co-hosted by the Hastings chapter of the National Lawyers Guild and the Hastings Race and Poverty Law Journal. […]

The revision and origin of Black August

by Kiilu Nyasha   “As a slave, the social phenomenon that engages my consciousness is, of course, revolution.” – George L. Jackson   The revision of Black August   George Jackson – Linocut: Santiago Armengod 2013 marks the 43rd anniversary of Black August, first organized to honor our fallen freedom fighters, George and Jonathan Jackson, […]

Rally for Yogi: It’s time for Hugo ‘Yogi Bear’ Pinell to come home!

by Kiilu Nyasha Long distance freedom fighters Donna Wallach and Kiilu Nyasha share their wisdom at the Rally for Yogi. – Photo: Scott Braley I’m delighted to report the rally for Yogi Bear was just wonderful. Headlined “49 Years of Injustice: Release Hugo Pinell,” decrying Yogi’s 49 years in prison, 43 years in solitary confinement and 23 […]

Slavery on the new plantation by Sis. Kiilu Nyasha

San Francisco | Police State and Prisonz Longtime San Francisco-based journalist/activist Kiilu Nyasha writes that “Chattel slavery was ended following prolonged guerrilla warfare between the slaves and the slave-owners and their political allies. Referred to as the ‘Underground Railroad,’ it was led by the revolutionary General Harriet Tubman with support from her alliances with abolitionists, […]