Father Augustus Tolton, First Black Priest in the U.S.

He was born of the marriage union of two slaves, Peter Paul Tolton and his wife Martha Jane, in Ralls County, Missouri, April 1, 1854. The slaveholders, the Elliots, had all their slaves baptized, including the Toltons and their four children.  With the outbreak of the War between the States, Peter Paul hoped to gain […]

Servant Of God Mother Mary Lange, O.S.P.

Elizabeth Clarisse Lange (Mother Mary Lange of the Oblate Sisters of Providence) was born circa 1784 and died February 3, 1882. Mother Mary Lange founded the Oblate Sisters of Providence in 1829. The Oblates were the first United States based religious order of women of color. The Oblate Sisters were role models who provided an […]

A painful reminder of cultural genocide

  What was supposed to be just another amateur wrestling match held in southern New Jersey on Dec. 19 turned out to be an act of unspeakable violence, prompting a viral response on Twitter. A white male referee, Alan Mahoney, gave a white woman a pair of scissors to cut off the dreadlocks of 15-year-old […]

Dec. 25, 1837: Seminole Anti-colonial Struggle

By William Katz On Christmas day in 1837, the Africans and Native Americans who formed Florida’s Seminole Nation defeated a vastly superior U.S. invading army bent on cracnsking this early rainbow coalition and returning the Africans to slavery. Though it reads like a Hollywood thriller, this amazing story has yet to capture public attention. It […]

Slavery and Prison – Understanding the Connections

by Kim Gilmore “I’M BEGINNING TO BELIEVE THAT `U.S.A.’ STANDS FOR THE UNDERPRIVILEGED Slaves of America” (Esposito and Wood, 1982: 149), wrote a 20th-century prisoner from Mississippi in a letter detailing the daily violence he witnessed behind prison walls. His statement resounds with a long tradition of prisoners, particularly African-American prisoners, who have used the […]

Skin bleaching: Identity crisis or mental slavery?

In 1492, Christopher Columbus stumbled upon the Americas and Caribbean Islands in search of the East Indies. With open arms, the naartives welcome him as their guest, oblivious to their impending doom. Bringing with him diseases and a hidden agenda, he was following orders from the Roman Catholic church to revitalize the failing European economy under […]

Amerikan Crime: The 1944 Lynching of 15-Year-Old Willie James Howard for Writing a Christmas Card to a White Girl

  THE CRIME In December 1943, Willie James Howard, a 15-year-old Black youth, was in the 10th grade in Live Oak, Florida, and working at the local dime store. For Christmas, Willie James gave cards to all his co-workers, including a 15-year-old white girl named Cynthia Goff. He signed the card to Cynthia “with L.” […]

Louis, the black Mauritian who led South Afrika’s first large-scale slave rebellion in 1808

Photo: SA History As many Africans in the Caribbean and the Americas rose against slavery, the news of these courageous acts found its way back to Africa.  In 1808, Cape Town, the then capital of the Cape Colony, experienced its first ever slave rebellion. The region, home to the Khoisan people, was invaded by the […]

How the Ashanti game of Oware was used by slaves in the Caribbean to plan their escape from plantations

Oware is considered the oldest Mancala board game in the world. Dating back centuries to ancient Africa, specifically the Ashanti tribe in Ghana, Mancala is one of the most commonly known board games in Africa, among others. The worldwide spread is noted to be because of the slave trade Carribean that saw many Africans sold to […]