When Enslaved People Commandeered a Ship and Hightailed it to Freedom in the Bahamas

It’s been called the most successful slave rebellion in U.S. history   Ships involved in the American slave trade before the Civil War. (Wikimedia Commons) By Kat Eschner smithsonian.com   ON this day in 1841, a shipboard rebellion led to 128 enslaved people gaining their freedom in the Bahamas. The Creole case made headlines in its own time, but […]

A hard road to travel: black people and racism in the 19th century United States

Issue: 156 Posted on 13th October 2017 Ken Olende The following lyrics were written by an anonymous black soldier in the 54th Massachusetts (Colored) Regiment, one of the first black combat regiments, at the height of the Civil War in the United States (1861-5). They undermine the pernicious myth that black people were bystanders in the […]

the “Snow Riot”

In 1835 Washington discovered Francis Scott Key, author of the national anthem, had a thing or two to learn about freedom By Jefferson Morley Sunday, February 6, 2005; Page W14 THE LAMPLIGHTER CAME AROUND AT DUSK. With his long flaming pole poked skyward, he sparked the bowls of oil atop the fluted posts around Lafayette Square. […]

Support demands of Prisoners United on hunger strike in Alameda and Santa Clara Counties

by Prisoners United via Silicon Valley De-Bug and Prisoners Hunger Strike Solidarity (PHSS) On Oct. 15, 2017, Prisoners United in Glenn Dyer Detention Center courageously led the way in a hunger strike that will span across two counties and four jails. Santa Rita Jail, Santa Clara County Main Jail and Elmwood D.O.C. will continue the […]

Lynching and Anti-Lynching: Art and Politics in the 1930s

by M. Lee Stone Lynching and Anti-Lynching: Art and Politics in the 1930s   “There were nearly 5,000 persons lynched from 1882 through 1965.” The term “lynching” supposedly originated during the American Revolution with Colonel Charles Lynch, a Virginia justice of the peace. Lynch ordered “extra legal punishment” for British Loyalists, hanging without a trial. […]

It’s not mass incarceration, but slavery

Speech delivered at the Millions for Prisoners Human Rights March Aug. 19, 2017, in Washington, D.C. We asked, or the organizers asked the people here today as representatives to speak a little bit about the 13th Amendment. Some of them got up here and told us how none of this is gonna work. Some of […]

The Actual Voices of Enslaved Black People Recorded From The 1800s

Amazing what was found on old recording devices from the late 1800’s. Records were found of multiple interviews of actual Black American slaves of the time. What you will hear is both disturbing and shocking. How does it make you feel?       These recordings are part of the WPA slave narratives, interviews which […]

No more fire fighting slave labor

by Gayle McLaughlin, former mayor of Richmond, Calif., and candidate for lieutenant governor of California As our tortured climate pounds the East with water and leaves much of California tinder dry, Southern California fire season seems to grow worse by the year. And in our growing need for firefighters, California continues the abusive practice of […]

US prisons practice the same slavery and racism celebrated by Confederate monuments

September 15, 2017 Assailing slavery and white supremacy today by Kevin “Rashid” Johnson On Aug. 11, white supremacists rallied in Charlottesville, Virginia, against the removal of the statue of Confederate general Robert E. Lee. In the wake of that rally, which turned deadly when a rally-goer plowed his car into a group of counter-demonstrators, killing […]

Homicide Justified: The Legality of Killing Slaves in the Atlantic World

By Andrew T. Fede “Flogging a slave fastened to the ground.” 1853. Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Manuscripts, Archives and Rare Books Division, The New York Public Library Digital Collections. This is an excerpt from the preface of Andrew T. Fede’s Homicide Justified: The Legality of Killing Slaves in the United States and the […]