York Explored the West With Lewis and Clark, But His Freedom Wouldn’t Come Until Decades Later

  A statue of York with Lewis and Clark in Great Falls, Montana. (Andre Jenny / Alamy Stock Photo) By Shoshi Parks Then again, York didn’t have a say in the matter. Though he had grown up side-by-side with William Clark—future leader of the first-known expedition to travel over land from the Eastern seaboard to the Pacific […]

Mass incarceration for profit: The dual impact of the 13th Amendment and the unresolved question of national oppression in the United States

African Americans remain the targets of a system of institutional racism and super-exploitation by Abayomi Azikiwe As the United States faces profound challenges in the areas of race relations, class exploitation, the rights of immigrants, women and other marginalized groups, the threat of world war and other potential calamities, it is of utmost necessity that those […]

The Endless Amerikan Horror: Lynching and Police

BY DEVON D. BOWERS In 1918 Brook County, Georgia, a local plantation owner was killed by Sidney Johnson, a black man who had been leased out to the plantation via the convict lease system, in a dispute over unpaid wages. Upon hearing this, the white community went on a rampage and lynched not only Johnson, but […]

Haiti: From trafficking to debt

Jérôme Duval Жером Дюваль جيروم دوڥال  Translated by  Jenny Bright Edited by  Supriyo Chatterjee সুপ্রিয় চট্টোপাধ্যায়   This Caribbean country is not in debt, it is a creditor. It is France which owes it money. Explanation by Jerome Duval, of CADTM.     Poverty in colonised countries has greatly increased due to a transfer of debt: the […]

Sights and Sounds from Dimona

The African Hebrew Israelites of Jerusalem is a vibrate community living in Dimona, Israel. They have sought to redefine themselves outside the vestiges of slavery and the African-american reality. With a Yah-centered mind-set they have created an urban kibbutz style living arrangement  unparalleled in its scope to reshape a people.   source: Sights and Sounds from […]

Slavery and the American University

by Alex Carp  NEW YORK REVIEW OF BOOKS From their very beginnings, the American university and American slavery have been intertwined, but only recently are we beginning to understand how deeply. According to the surviving records, the first enslaved African in Massachusetts was the property of the schoolmaster of Harvard. Yale funded its first graduate-level courses and […]

Today In History (Our-story)

On this day in 1818, American writer and abolitionist Frederick Douglass chose to mark his birthday. Born into slavery around this date under the name Frederick Bailey in Tuckahoe, Maryland, Douglass fled to New Bedford, Massachusetts, in 1836 and went on to establish himself as one of his generation’s leading minds.

Whitney Plantation museum confronts painful history of slavery

  CBS This Morning – Published on Apr 8, 2015     The first museum in America dedicated entirely to slavery opened a few months ago in Wallace, Louisiana. Michelle Miller visits the museum and found a surprising history, not only about the plantation, but her own family.   >via: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JfC8X2Os2z4

What Students Are Taught About Slavery

 by Jacob Sugarman  ALTERNET Just eight percent of American high school seniors can identify the cause of the Civil War; less than a third (32 percent) know which amendment abolished slavery in the U.S.; and fewer than half (46 percent) know that the “Middle Passage” refers to the harrowing voyage across the Atlantic undertaken by Africans kidnapped […]